10 Most Difficult Dogs to Raise

Raising a dog is not a responsibility to take lightly. Many dog lovers believe there’s no such thing as a difficult dog, only poor training. Any dog can be trained, if the proper routine is followed. There are, however, some breeds that may pose more of a challenge than others. The genetic traits bred into dogs in the past to may make them better suited to the job they were bred for, especially working dogs. Consistency in routine is the most important factor in training any dog.

Rottweiler

 Rottweiler

Let’s start this list with a dog that’s often referred to as a gentle giant, the almighty Rottweiler. Rottweiler dogs were originally known as Rottweil butchers’ dogs after the area in Germany in which they were commonly used to pull carts loaded with meat and other produce to market. Rottweilers can grow up to 27 inches in height and weigh up to 130 lbs when full size and the bulk of this animal combined with its impressively rumbling growl can make Rottweilers seem quite intimidating. The main thing that makes Rottweilers difficult to raise is not only their size and strength but their need for a clear and powerful leader. Rottweilers want to know exactly who is in charge and if you’re not fulfilling the position adequately they will be more than happy to take over. If you put in the groundwork and are not afraid of laying down some strong discipline your Rottweiler will pay you back with startling displays of loyalty and will protect you any way they can.

West Highland White Terrier

West Highland White Terrier

West Highland White Terriers or ‘Westies’ as they’re commonly known are every grandma’s favorite breed. The main issue that can make these adorable, scrappy little dogs difficult to raise is the challenge they pose when house-training. These petite Scottish terriers tend to grow to about 11 inches in height and just 20lbs in weight but for a small dog they need tons and tons of exercise. Once used in their native Scotland to hunt rodents, Westies are very intelligent and like to be active. Westies love to chase things and are generally good with children but don’t tolerate rough-handling very well and have been known to snap when hurt. It’s important to introduce a period of confinement when you first take on your Westie as it’s said that this is the only way to effectively house-train them. It’s not necessary to keep the dog in a crate but it is advisable to set aside a small area with a training pad so they understand where it is okay and not okay to go to the bathroom .

American Pit Bull

American Pit Bull

American Pit Bull Terriers were once the most popular dog in the United States. During WWI, the United States Army even used the lovable Pit Bull breed as a mascot due to the belief that the breed represented American spirit and bravery. However, a study done by DogBite.org in 2009 showed that the Pit Bull was responsible for more fatal dog bites than any other dog. These statistics are likely the result of American Pit Bulls being purchased by people who have neither the time nor the knowledge to train them properly. The real difficulty in raising an American Pit Bull is overcoming the stigma that surrounds the breed. With in-depth and carefully executed training an American Pit Bull can become a fully socialized and family-friendly pet, but new owners must be willing to put in the hours with these notoriously temperamental dogs.

Siberian Husky

Siberian Husky

If you can’t have a wolf at home then you can have the next best thing and take on a Siberian Husky as a family pet. Beautiful to look at, Siberian Huskies are known to be incredibly affectionate and good-tempered dogs who are always happy to be given attention. The difficulty in raising a Husky comes from the dog’s history of being bred as a working dog. Originally used in very cold, snowy climates to pull sleds over long distances, Huskies are incredibly hardy and energetic and need a serious amount of exercise to use up all of that stored energy. If you neglect to give your Husky an outlet for its liveliness it may resort to tearing up your furniture. Huskies are also incredibly intelligent which makes them good escape artists and poorly trained Huskies have been known to resort to natural predatory tendencies, creating a serious problem for any smaller animals you may keep in the house. But with a devoted training and exercise schedule there’s no reason you and your Husky couldn’t live in perfect harmony.

German Shepherd

German Shepherd

German Shepherds are incredibly intelligent which is great but can make raising them as domestic pets a challenge. German Shepherds are working dogs that were originally bred to herd sheep but were quickly promoted to roles in search-and-rescue, guiding for the blind and police and military assistance. German Shepherds are large dogs with thick, heavy-shedding coats and can grow up to about 28 inches in height and at least 88 lbs in weight. German Shepherds are lively, curious dogs and have a great need for structure and activity in their day to day lives. Not content to be left alone in one place for very long, German Shepherds require serious training and exercise every single day. While training your German Shepherd to respond correctly to commands and be an effective guard dog is key to its education, you also need to ensure your dog is properly socialized as it could become somewhat over-protective of yourself and your family. Unfortunately German Shepherds are also known to be prone to number of series health disorders such as hip dysplasia and neurological disorders.

Bulldog

Bulldog

Bulldogs are adorable which is the main reason they are one of the most popular breeds of dog in the US and UK. Generally very good-natured dogs who love to play, Bulldogs are docile and make for great family pets. Many owners note that Bulldogs are incredibly patient, particularly with children, and form such strong bonds with their family that they rarely like to be alone, preferring to stay indoors and take long naps on people’s laps. Unfortunately it is the Bulldog’s unique and loveable appearance that has inadvertently led to tendency towards health issues. With layers of wrinkled skin around their faces, heavy jowls and a flat face often offset by a tremendous underbite, Bulldogs are more sensitive to heat, exercise and stress. Bulldogs have been bred over the years to have a more pronounced underbite and a wider stance which has led to breathing issues and hip problems in some dogs. The only way to discourage this worrying trend is to use a reputable breeder.

St Bernard

 St Bernard

St Bernards are classified as giant dogs and have been known to reach over 300 lb in weight. Traditionally used in Switzerland, Italy and the Swiss Alps as rescue dogs, St Bernards were once known as Swiss Mountain Dogs. Incredibly loveable, St Bernards’ energy levels can range from completely docile to Jack Russell puppy levels making training a St Bernard puppy quite a challenge. Because of its enormous size, raising a St Bernard can be a lot of hard work and it takes a lot of walking to use up all of this magnificent animal’s stored energy. The St Bernard’s heavy, low-hanging tail and tendency to drool almost constantly makes them completely unsuitable for small homes with a lot of soft furnishings. Contrary to most people’s expectations, St Bernards are very much indoor dogs who like to be comfortable at home with their families. Bred to work in cold climates and with a thick, shaggy coat, St Bernards are very sensitive to heat and need to be kept cool whenever possible.

Akita

Akita

Akitas are stunning dogs that originate in the mountainous regions of Northern Japan. Large dogs, Akitas resemble Siberian Huskies with short double coats and fairly long, heavy limbs. Akitas have large, bear-like heads with triangular ears and their tails curl over their backs in a gentle curl. Originally bred in Japan to hunt bears, elk, boars and other big game, Akitas have retained a startling prey drive and are generally quite difficult for inexperienced owners to train. Powerful and independent dogs, Akitas constantly try to assert their independence and generally don’t like to be walked on a leash. Akitas are said to be characteristically aloof with strangers but can be effectively trained to be friendly family pets. Akitas need at least 30 minutes of fast-paced walking every day so are not suitable for any owners with mobility issues and their tendency to shed heavily makes them better suited to an environment with hard floors. Generally hardy, Akitas are known to suffer from certain allergies and to be peculiarly sensitive to certain drugs.

Chow Chow

Chow Chow

Chow Chow dogs may look like adorable, glass-eyed teddy bears but they are not the placid fluff-balls they first appear to be. Originally from Northern China, Chow Chows are commonly known as ‘fluffy lion dogs’ in Chinese. Believed to be one of the ancient dog breeds used as a model for Chinese guardian lions commonly seen guarding Buddhist temples and palaces of the Tang Empire and later, Chow Chows remain a popular breed in China. However Chow Chows are known to be somewhat grumpy dogs displaying aloof behavior that is often likened to that of cats. Chow Chows are frequently said to form a strong attachment to one of two members of a family, even becoming over-protective of them, while displaying aggressive behavior to the others. It is possible to train a Chow Chow to be more friendly and sociable but it takes a great deal of dedication. Chow Chows can be characteristically lazy and are quite happy to stay inside an apartment all day but if you force your Chow Chow to be more active it may improve their behavior.

Weimaraner

Weimaraner

Weimaraners are unique in appearance and temperament. Known as the ‘grey ghost’, Weimaraners have a distinctive short grey coat and are known for sticking close to their masters – sometimes too close. The Weimaraner gets its name from the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, a German nobleman who once used the dogs in large game hunting. A fiercely energetic hunting dog, the Weimaraner has incredible physical endurance and stamina making him a real challenge to train. No walk is too far for the Weimaraner and if you think running away from him might work you’d be wrong as the Weimaraner is highly intelligent and very skilled at tracking. Weimaraner dogs do not like to be left alone and experience acute separation anxiety if separated from their owner after long periods in their company. Poorly-raised Weimaraners are notoriously difficult to house-train and can be a menace to other small animals in the vicinity. However, if you’re looking for a dog to take on long camping and hiking trips you may have found your perfect companion.

YOUR REACTION?

Facebook Conversations